BT Tanks

Louis

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The BT tanks, dubbed "Quick Tanks" were created in the 1930s by the Soviet army as "Chariots of Cavalry". -

Compared to the T-26 ( http://www.thefewgoodmen.com/thefgmforum/showthread.php?12133-T-26 ), the most notable difference is its great speed and power / weight ratio, and the ability to roll with tracks or wheels, while in terms of weaponry and armor were equal. -

The BT tanks were "convertible tanks". This was a feature designed by J. Walter Christie to reduce wear of the unreliable tank tracks of the 1930s. In about thirty minutes the crew could remove the tracks and engage a chain drive to the rearmost road wheel on each side, allowing the tank to travel at very high speeds on roads. In wheeled mode the tank was steered by pivoting the front road wheels. However, Soviet tank forces soon found the convertible option of little practical use in a country with few paved roads, and it consumed space and added needless complexity and weight. The feature was dropped from later Soviet designs.-


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BT-5 image

Variants:
BT-1: Christie prototype with no turret.
BT-2 Model 1932: M-5-400 engine (copy of U.S. Liberty engine), three modifications of turret produced: with single 37 mm gun; 37 mm gun and one DT machine gun; twin DP machine guns mount and a single machine gun. In late 1932 modified to BT-3 but produced under same designation.
BT-3: same as BT-2, produced according to metric system (instead of Imperial system as used for BT-2). In official documentation referred to as BT-2.
BT-4: was a design with welded hull and minor changes in the suspension. 3 prototypes produced (with partially riveted hull)
BT-5: larger cylindrical turret, 45 mm gun, coaxial DT machine gun.
BT-5 Model 1933: new turret with twin hatches and larger bustle.
BT-5PKh: snorkelling variant (prototypes only).
BT-5A: artillery support version with 76.2 mm howitzer (few made).
BT-5 flamethrower tank: (prototypes only).
PT-1A: amphibious variant with new hull (few made).
BT-7 Model 1935: welded hull, redesigned hull front, new Mikulin M-17T engine (licensed copy of a BMW engine), enclosed muffler.
BT-7 Model 1937: new turret with sloping armour.
BT-7TU: command version, with whip antenna instead of earlier frame antenna.
BT-7A: artillery support version with 76.2 mm howitzer.
OP-7: flame-thrower version with external fuel panniers (prototype only).
BT-7M[3] (1938, prototypes designated A-8; sometimes referred to as BT-8): new V-2 diesel engine replacing earlier gasoline engines, three DT machine guns: coaxial, in P-40 AA mount on roof and in a ball-mount on turret rear.
BT-42: Finnish assault gun; captured BT-7s were equipped with British 114 mm howitzers.
BT-IS: Prototype/proof-of-concept platform with heavily sloped armor; forerunner of the armor design on the T-34.
BT-SW-2 Cherepakha ("turtle"): Another prototype, which took the armour sloping to an extreme.
A-20: Prototype for a new BT tank, with 20 mm armour, 45mm gun, model V-2 diesel engine, and 8×6-wheel convertible drive. Lost out in trials to the A-32, which was further improved and produced as the T-34 medium tank.
TTBT-5, TTBT-7: teletanks, remote-controlled tanks.
 
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